Cheapest New Cars 2023 in USA: Save Money Buying these Amazing Looking Cars

Are you on the lookout for an affordable and stylish new car in USA in 2023? Look no further! In this blog post, we will explore the world of budget-friendly new cars, showcasing a handpicked selection of amazing-looking vehicles that won’t break the bank.

Whether you’re a first-time car buyer or seeking to upgrade your current ride, these affordable options will delight both your wallet and your sense of style.

We understand the significance of finding a vehicle that aligns with your budget without compromising on style or quality. That’s why we’ve handpicked the cheapest new cars available in the USA for 2023, presenting an irresistible combination of head-turning designs and pocket-friendly price tags.

From sleek sedans to sporty hatchbacks, these cars will not only elevate your driving experience but also keep your financial well-being intact.

10 Cheapest New Cars

10. Nissan Sentra – $20,635

The Nissan Sentra
won’t knock your socks off with excitement, but it’s rich with standard
safety features. Under the hood is a 149-hp inline-four engine and CVT.

The last Sentra we tested strolled to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds, a little
quicker than others on this list. It’s not as fun to drive as the Honda
Civic, but even the highest Sentra SR trim starts under the Civic’s base
price.

  • Base Price: $20,635
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 33/29/39 mpg
  • Warranty: 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain and 3-year/36,000-mile limited warranty

9. Kia Soul – $20,505

The thrifty Kia Soul is the only entry on this list with not one but two 10Best awards.
It carries a small price tag, impressive cargo space, and its 147-hp
inline-four with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) doesn’t feel
underpowered.

  • Base price: $20,505
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 27/25/31 mpg (2.0L)
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain and 5-year/60,000-mile limited warranty

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8. Hyundai Venue – $20,245

The subcompact segment is stacked with entries. Some of them are good, many are sleep inducing. The Hyundai Venue
is at least affordable.

Power comes from a 121-hp inline-four with a
CVT. Battling micro machines is futile, but the Venue is 1.1 seconds
quicker to 60 than the pricier Nissan Kicks and 2.4 seconds quicker than the Toyota C-HR.

  • Base price: $20,245
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 31/30/33 mpg
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain, 5-year/60,000-mile limited, 3-year/36,000-mile complimentary maintenance

7. Kia Forte – $20,115

The Kia Forte
is the Korean brand’s top-selling model. The base engine is a buzzy
147-hp inline-four, and the Forte gets incredible gas mileage with an
EPA-estimated 41 mpg on the highway. It also has a larger gas tank than Honda Civic and Volkswagen Golf, giving the Forte an EPA-estimated 490 miles before returning to a gas station.

  • Base price: $20,115
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 35/31/41 mpg
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain and 5-year/60,000-mile limited warranty

6. Subaru Impreza – $19,790

The Subaru Impreza
is the most affordable vehicle with AWD available today. Power comes
from a 152-hp flat-four with a five-speed manual transmission. Its lack
of urgency brings better fuel efficiency with an EPA-estimated 31-mpg
highway fuel economy.

  • Base price: $19,790
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 26/23/31 mpg (Manual)
  • Warranty: 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain and 3-year/36,000-mile limited warranty

5. Hyundai Accent – $17,690

You’ve likely rented one at an airport or taken a seat in a Hyundai Accent
during a recent Uber ride—not that either experience would convince you
to buy one.

A 120-hp four-cylinder and CVT move the Accent, sort of.
The last Accent we tested made it to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds, making it one of the slowest cars we tested in 2021.

  • Base price: $17,690
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 33/29/39 mpg
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain, 5-year/60,000-mile limited, 3-year/36,000-mile complimentary maintenance

4. Kia Rio – $17,275

Two body styles fit the Kia Rio.
The sedan is $940 cheaper than the five-door hatch. A 120-hp
inline-four with a CVT is the only powertrain, and the Rio is only
front-wheel powered.

Its subcompact size makes it entertaining to drive
with solid body control through corners, but its dull steering is an
immediate reminder of affordability. Gas stations hate them, as the Rio
gets an EPA-estimated 33 mpg city and 41 mpg highway.

  • Base price: $17,275
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 36/33/41 mpg
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain and 5-year/60,000-mile limited warranty

3. Nissan Versa – $16,205

The Nissan Versa
comes with a slew of standard safety features such as front- and
rear-automated emergency braking, automatic high beams, and
lane-departure warning. A 122-hp inline-four powers the front wheels,
with a standard five-speed manual transmission on the base S model.

If
it makes you feel any better, people spending close to $20,000 on a
Versa SR or SV have just as much horsepower, but with a boring CVT.
However, the manual transmission is noticeably worse for fuel economy,
with an EPA-estimated 35 mpg highway versus the CVT’s 40 mpg.

  • Base price: $16,205
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 30/27/35 mpg
  • Warranty: 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain and 3-year/36,000-mile limited warranty

2. Mitsubishi Mirage – $16,125

The Mitsubishi Mirage is nearly America’s cheapest new car. The Mirage hatchback and Mirage G4
sedan come with the same 78-hp three-cylinder engine. A five-speed
manual transmission is standard. The last Mirage we tested used a CVT
and took 12.8 seconds to reach 60 mph.

To get to 90 mph you’ll need to
flatten the right pedal for 35.6 seconds. And it takes over a quarter
of a mile for the Mirage to reach 75 mph. The savings, however, are
immediate.

  • Base price: $16,125
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 36/33/41 mpg
  • Warranty: 10-year/100,000-mile and 5-year/60,000-mile limited warranty.

1. Chevrolet Spark – $14,595

Chevy loses its Spark for 2023, as the model is being discontinued
without any direct replacement. The Spark, which has been America’s
cheapest new car since 2020, is, however, a great value.

Power comes
from a tiny 98-hp inline-four, with a five-speed manual standard in its
cheapest form. The Spark gets an EPA-estimated 38 mpg on the highway,
and its nine-gallon fuel tank is cheap to refill. Unfortunately, the
Spark lacks greatly in standard safety features.

There’s no
forward-collision warning or automated emergency braking unless you pay
extra. Cruise control is also extra.

  • Base price: $14,595
  • Fuel Economy EPA combined/city/highway: 33/29/38 mpg
  • Warranty:
    5-year/60,000-mile powertrain, 3-year/36,000-mile limited, and one
    complimentary maintenance visit for the first year

Yes,
he’s still working on the 1986 Nissan 300ZX Turbo project car he
started in high school, and no, it’s not for sale yet. Austin Irwin was
born and raised in Michigan, and, despite getting shelled by hockey
pucks during a not-so-successful goaltending career through high school
and college, still has all of his teeth.

He loves cars from the 1980s
and Bleu, his Great Pyrenees, and is an active member of the Buffalo
Wild Wings community. When Austin isn’t working on his own cars, he’s
likely on the side of the highway helping someone else fix theirs.

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